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5 Dishes to Eat in Peru

Peru
arwindsharma

Peru is fast-gaining a spot in international culinary conversations. It is home to dishes and flavours that are unique to the region, and not found anywhere else. Few places offer such diversity of ingredients,... Read more

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A Local’s Guide to Eating and Drinking in San Diego Dan Patterson June 22, 2017

Mike Hess Brewing beer, in San Diego
Mike Hess Brewing (courtesy of CityPASS)

In this guest post, our discount-snagging friends at CityPASS share some of their favorite spots for eating and drinking (local beer, natch) in sunny San Diego. Fish tacos, anyone?

San Diego’s near-perfect weather and waves draw in the surfers and sand castles, but it’s the city’s food and drink that make San Diego a uniquely delicious destination. Enjoy your time as a local would with this guide to San Diego restaurants and breweries. First up? Get to know our two favorite areas, Ocean Beach and the Uptown area of North Park and Hillcrest.

Reflections of the shoreline and palm trees at Ocean Beach, San Diego
Ocean Beach. Courtesy of Brian Roberts/Flickr

Ocean Beach welcomes people from all walks of...

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Tags: United States beer

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Q&A: John Simmons, Sixth-Generation Tabasco Maker, Louisiana Celeste Allen May 18, 2017

John Simmons of McIlhenny Company, making Tabasco sauce

People across the world associate Tabasco sauce with the very unique, flavorful food culture found here in Louisiana, and we’re honored to be a part of that.”  —John Simmons, tabasco pepper expert, McIlhenny Company, Avery Island

Hot sauce is like salt in Louisiana. People add it to everything.

In New Orleans, about 140 miles east of Tabasco’s headquarters, food is known for its bold spicing. Cayenne pepper gives crawfish their delicious tang, while jalapeños add a subtle, savory kick to cornbread. And Tabasco, perhaps the most famous Louisiana hot sauce, lends its punch to potato chips, mayonnaise, Bloody Marys, and even ice cream.

We wanted to know more about the latter’s...

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Tags: food producer Q&A United States

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Japantown, San Francisco, in 36 Hours Mary Charlebois April 27, 2017

Japantown umbrella mural, in San Francisco
Japantown mural. All photos by Mary Charlebois

Ethereal tonkotsu, silky ramen. Tangy, crisp pickles. Sushi, sashimi, spicy-sweet ginger, and sake. Sweet, chewy mochi. Soak it all up with 36 hours in San Francisco’s Japantown.

Six square blocks embody Japanese food, history, and culture. Traditional and modern ideals thrive side by side: kimonos and cosplay, silk paintings and anime, antique bowls and dollar-store plastic. Japanese-language signs describe produce at the corner market. There are noodle shops and hibachis, tea and sake. A pagoda made of cement. Lattes and matchas served at the same counter. Youngsters and elders walk together from school. Victorian mansions cozy up...

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Tags: United States

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Eating Moravian Food in Winston-Salem, North Carolina Jennifer Bean Bower March 1, 2017

Winston-Salem skyline in North Carolina
Photo courtesy of Visit Winston-Salem

Winston-Salem might be better known for Krispy Kreme doughnuts, tobacco-industry ties, and handcrafted wood furniture, but it’s also got an interesting (and edible!) streak of Moravian history in it. Our local writer fills us in.  

The Moravians who settled in North Carolina traced their faith to the Bohemian priest John Hus, who was burned at the stake in 1415 in present-day Germany for challenging the authorities and principles of the Catholic Church. His followers formed the Unitas Fratrum, or Unity of the Brethren, which spread throughout Bohemia, Moravia—hence the name “Moravians”—and Poland. From there, missionaries headed to Germany...

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Tags: United States

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Q&A: Mario Monticelli, Napa Valley Winemaker, California Laura Siciliano-Rosen December 6, 2016

Mario Monticelli of Trinchero Estate, a Napa Valley winemaker
All photos courtesy of Trinchero Napa Valley

“[At a family-owned winery], you can think with your heart—it’s not about meeting a bottom line.” –Mario Monticelli, Napa Valley winemaker

If you're like us, you've always wondered 1) what's it like to live and work in the gorgeous Napa Valley, and 2) what's it like to be the person responsible for creating some of the fabulous wine that comes out of there. We recently had the opportunity to learn both from Mario Monticelli of Trinchero Napa Valley Winery, a beautiful, state-of-the-art winery (and one of the wildly successful Trinchero Family Estates' brands) whose family legacy stretches back to 1948, when two Italian immigrants...

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Tags: food producer Q&A United States wine drinks

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How the Tibetan Momo Became a Cultural Icon in Queens Laura Siciliano-Rosen November 23, 2015

Selection of momos from Jackson Heights, Queens

“Local food” is the name of the game here at Eat Your World. But what is local food? Sure, we define it every which way on our FAQ page, some of it being quite obvious: native dishes, locally produced foods. It’s the gray area surrounding our definition of “traditional,” however, that always keeps the hunt interesting:

If not actually invented there, it is traditional to that place (i.e., historically eaten there, perhaps because the place was settled by immigrant group A two decades ago, or because a dish has long been served by a local institution so as to become a part of the area’s culinary landscape).

For this reason, we count Middle Eastern food as “local” to Detroit and...

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Tags: Queens United States

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Celebrating 10 Years of Marriage at Eleven Madison Park, NYC Laura Siciliano-Rosen May 12, 2015

A tribute to New York City's culinary traditions, fine dining when it counts, and 10-plus years of loving food—and each other.

Black and white cookies from Eleven Madison Park in NYC
Eleven Madison Park's playful take on the B&W cookie, filled with lemon verbena

Anyone who knows us knows we don’t, for several reasons, make a habit of dining at pricy Michelin-starred restaurants. In fact, Scott and I generally prefer to eat at small, hole-in-the-wall-type places that deal in unpretentious homemade food—like many of the restaurants found in our Queens neighborhood, for example. But certain occasions call for a real culinary splurge, and our 10-year wedding anniversary was definitely one of them. Tibetan momos, as much as we love them,...

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Tags: United States

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Derby Dining in Louisville: What to Eat Laura Siciliano-Rosen April 23, 2015

Horses racing at Churchill Downs in Louisville, KY
Churchill Downs. Photo by Scott B. Rosen

It’s that time of year again in Louisville—when the big hats and big bucks come out to play at Churchill Downs for the annual Kentucky Derby horse-racing event. There will be drama, there will be betting, and you can rest assured there will be bourbon, but whether you’re there to witness “the Most Exciting Two Minutes in Sports” or just to soak up the hoopla around the ongoing Derby Festival, there’s one thing you don’t have to gamble with: delicious local food. From the city’s signature hot brown and a hip country-ham “bar” to Top Chef contestant Edward Lee’s two excellent restaurants—not to mention the requisite drive out in the country to...

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Tags: United States

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One Shot From…Charleston, South Carolina Laura Siciliano-Rosen December 3, 2014

This new photo series calls on a handful of locals of a city we’re covering to tell us, in one photo—not necessarily of food—what that city means to them. First up, in honor of EYW’s Charleston Food Week, is Charleston, South Carolina.


Sweet tea at a tea plantation in Charleston, SC

"Enjoying a fresh-brewed sweet tea among the tea trees of North America's only tea plantation. Much like the rest of the city, Charleston Tea Plantation on Wadmalaw Island is both beautiful and delicious."Scott Wink, Charleston Food Bloggers

Follow Charleston Food Bloggers on Twitter @FoodBloggersCHS and Instagram @charlestonfoodbloggers

 

A palmetto palm between two buildings in Charleston, SC

“We love this photo because it dramatizes how insuppressible and anarchic the botanical aspect of...

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Tags: photos United States

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EYW's Charleston Food Week: What to Eat in the Holy City + a Giveaway! Laura Siciliano-Rosen December 1, 2014

Our destination spotlight on Charleston features some of our favorite Lowcountry dishes, but that’s not all: Stay tuned this week for a slew of fun Charlestonian giveaways across all our social media channels—follow #EYWCharleston to find them! Our first one is here: Leave a comment to enter to win a package of benne wafers, Charleston’s signature sesame-seed cookie, courtesy of Southern Sisters Bakery.  [Contest is now closed; see comments for winner!]

Frogmore stew in honor of Eat Your World's Charleston Food Week

Charleston is a real pleasure to eat in. It’s a pleasure for the other senses, too—the gorgeous 200-year-old homes; the long, flat, ideal-for-strolling coastlines; the salty, swampy breezes—but food is a definite draw down here, and...

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Tags: contests destinations United States

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Halloween Spider Cookies Laura Siciliano-Rosen October 27, 2014

Halloween spider cookies with recipe

We are the first to admit these cookies don’t qualify as “regional food”—unless, of course, you were to look at American holiday cuisine as a whole, but that’s a stretch, isn’t it? The thing is, we don’t bake much in the way of sweets, but these have become something of a Halloween tradition for us, delicious and adorable and simple to make, and therefore worth sharing with our food-loving readers. The “artistic” part of making those spiders is a bit labor-intensive, truth be told, but overall this is a pretty easy way to impress your friends/kids/coworkers. (And you get to eat the ones you mess up.)

This recipe from Jen’s Favorite Cookies has never let us down, although we add a...

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Tags: United States recipes

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Eat Your World's Food Tour in Queens Laura Siciliano-Rosen September 26, 2014

Papri chaat in Queens, NY
Papri chaat: a tour favorite [photo: Sam Kolich]

For years now, Scott and I have taken our friends, and friends of friends, on an informal food tour of our deliciously diverse neck of Queens: Jackson Heights and Elmhurst. Here is a 12-block or so radius that encompasses restaurants, cafes, and street vendors from at least as many countries, including but not limited to India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Tibet, Colombia, Mexico, Ecuador, Korea, Thailand, and China. The food is not only fun and educational to try; walking around here provides the rare opportunity to cross continents, to interact with immigrants from around the globe, in the space of just a few hours. It’s the New York City...

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Tags: news United States Queens

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How to Eat Like a Local in New York City Laura Siciliano-Rosen September 10, 2014

Scott and I have called various parts of NYC home for 14-plus years now, which, besides dating us considerably, means we've eaten quite a lot in this fair town of ours. It was here, after all, where my own love for food, and for experiencing foods from far-flung cultures, blossomed to the point of obsession, and where we've moved whole neighborhoods, boroughs even, largely to surround ourselves with more interesting, authentic global eats. Within this article, I’ve detailed much of what I’d send to any friend/acquaintance/reader who writes me asking what and where to eat while in New York (of course, I always send along EYW’s NYC regional-food guide, too). Happy eating!
 

Smoked salmon on a bagel from Russ & Daughters, NYC
Smoked...

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Tags: United States

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New England Seafood Shacks: 3 to Try Laura Siciliano-Rosen July 24, 2014

We always wish we had more time to explore the nooks and crannies of the New England coast, the quaint downtowns and salty enclaves nestled between our usual destinations of New Haven, Providence, Boston, and Cape Cod. But until we make that rambling road trip happen, we are content with stopovers for good grub on our way up the coast to visit the Cape every summer. Recent years have taken us to Cranston for an icy Del’s lemonade and to Fall River for our favorite Portuguese pastries, but this year we had seafood on the brain. Here are a few great new-to-us spots:
 

Lobster roll on a bun from Connecticut


Abbott’s Lobster in the Rough
Generally the first thing that comes to mind when we’re in the car, driving north...

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Tags: United States road trip

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Get Your Hot Dogs, America! Laura Siciliano-Rosen June 30, 2014

Chili cheese dog from Pink's in L.A.
A chili cheese dog from Pink's, a Hollywood icon

Summer is prime hot dog season in the U.S., when warm temps invite grilling, beer drinking, and lazy hand-held-sandwich eating. This Friday, wiener consumption will hit its yearly peak: Every July 4, Americans put away an estimated 150 million hot dogs, a nice chunk of which will probably be consumed at Coney Island, Brooklyn, during the annual Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest championship. It’s fitting, perhaps—the neighborhood represents the birthplace of hot dogs in the U.S. (via the Germans, of course)—but the Nathan’s dog is just one of many around the country with which people will be stuffing their faces this summer. Hot...

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Tags: United States

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Maine Avenue Fish Market: Washington, D.C'.s Real Deal Laura Siciliano-Rosen June 11, 2014

Chesapeake Bay blue crabs from Maine Ave Fish Market, Washington, DC

Drive down to the Maine Avenue Fish Market, in southwest D.C., early on a Saturday evening, and you may immediately regret it. Cars are everywhere, vying for parking and backed up in slow-moving lines; a parade of people move toward the open-air seafood counters, where more long lines await; wholesale trucks pull into the middle of the space to unload or pick up crabs at what seem like inopportune times. It’s crowded and chaotic, it smells like fish, you will wait on long lines, and if you happen to have a one-year-old like we do, well, he won’t be happy about it. But as all the locals who drive out of their way to stop here know, the haul you get will be dirt-cheap and super...

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Tags: United States markets

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Anatomy of a West Coast Jewish Deli Carina Chiodo June 2, 2014

Pastrami sign outside Jewish deli in California

Steeped in tradition, Jewish delis around the United States are beloved, often generations-old fixtures. Many of them share similar characteristics—a homey yet straightforward vibe, encyclopedic menus, the familiar routine of big, delicious portions served fast—but their historic natures tend to reflect region as well: pastrami samples at the ready at Katz’s in New York, local farmhouse cheeses at Zingerman’s in Ann Arbor, Italian hot dogs at Harold’s in Edison, New Jersey. In California, Jewish delis have taken on the characteristics of the region’s culinary culture as well, beginning with their emphasis on seasonal produce. Here are some hallmarks diners might recognize when...

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Q&A: Davide Dukcevich, 3rd-Gen Prosciutto Man, Rhode Island Laura Siciliano-Rosen May 29, 2014

Davide Dukcevich of Daniele, Inc in Rhode Island

“I fell in love with the story of my family’s business. It was a story I wanted to tell.” —Davide Dukcevich, co-owner, Daniele, Inc.

We were fortunate to meet Davide and his products recently, and were impressed by how straight-outta-Italy the prosciutto and mortadella tasted. It’s no wonder, given the history of the family business: His grandparents, Croatian refugees who landed in northern Italy after WWII, made sausages there for decades before their son, Davide’s father, brought the business to Rhode Island in 1977. Today, Davide and his brother, Stefano, are running things, overseeing the production of traditionally dry-cured, regionally sourced meats from prosciutto and...

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Tags: food producer Q&A United States

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Where to Eat Middle Eastern Food in Detroit Laura Siciliano-Rosen April 14, 2014

Middle Eastern platter from Dearborn, Michigan

Dearborn, a city within the Detroit metropolitan area, has a long-established Arab-American population, accounting for some 40% of the total population—the largest proportion among U.S. cities of similar size. The first Arab immigrants, mostly Syrian/Lebanese Christians, migrated for auto-industry work around the turn of the 20th century (the Ford Motor Company is headquartered in Dearborn; Henry Ford once lived here); they were soon followed by Palestinians, Jordanians, Yemenis, and Chaldeans/Iraqis. Today Dearborn is not only home to North America’s largest mosque, but also countless Middle Eastern groceries, bakeries, and restaurants. Got business in Detroit? A Middle Eastern...

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Tags: United States

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Crawfish Boil How-To Laura Siciliano-Rosen March 25, 2014

Backyard crawfish boil in Louisiana
Photo courtesy of Chris Davis

Crawfish boils are a springtime rite of passage in southern Louisiana, whether you’re in a bar, at a festival, or in a friend’s backyard. I’ll never forget the boil we went to, at New Orleans’ Maple Leaf Bar, where a small door fee covered both music and food (the Uptown bar holds crawfish boils on Sunday nights during the season). In an alley outside the bar, we glimpsed the giant pot of critters, and all the delicious stuff going in along with them—mushrooms, corn, potatoes, quail, andouille and boudin sausages—and knew we were in for a treat.

Backyard boils are, of course, more the local way, the equivalent of having friends over for beers and a...

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Tags: United States recipes

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Q&A: Patrick Murtaugh, Craft Beer Brewer, Richmond, VA Laura Siciliano-Rosen January 14, 2014

The founders and craft beer brewers of Hardywood Park brewery, Richmond, VA
             Eric McKay (left) and Patrick Murtaugh of Hardywood Park

“Richmond has a beer scene similar to what you saw 10 years ago in the Pacific Northwest. The market is not yet saturated and there’s still an enthusiasm for craft beer that borders on fanatical.” —Patrick Murtaugh, cofounder and master brewer, Hardywood Park brewery

Tell us about what you do.
In short, we make beer. We lean toward beers that are stylistically underrepresented in the market. Our Reserve Series is dedicated to using at least one local ingredient in each beer: local wildflower honey, baby ginger, blackberries, raspberries, locally roasted coffee. We also put a lot of effort into trying to engage...

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Tags: food producer Q&A United States

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Road Trip: Portuguese Food in Fall River, Massachusetts Laura Siciliano-Rosen December 19, 2013

Interior of Billy's Cafe in Fall River, MA
Inside the now-defunct Billy's Cafe, Fall River. Photos by Scott Rosen.

Fall River, Massachusetts, is the kind of town most people drive through to get someplace else. Once a center of textile manufacturing, it’s long since fallen on rough economic times, and is now rather gray and desolate in stretches, even despite the picturesque Braga Bridge and “Gates of the City,” the latter a gift from its sister city in the Azores. For us, it’s usually a pit stop en route to Cape Cod. Fortunately, there’s always been something in Fall River that makes pulling off the highway worth our while: killer Portuguese food.

Portuguese egg tarts from Barcelos Bakery in Fall River, MA
Pastéis de nata from a Fall River bakery

Fall River, along with other...

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Tags: road trip destinations United States

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Virginia Is for...Foodies? Richmond Chefs Come to N.Y.C. Laura Siciliano-Rosen November 16, 2013

Charcuterie, Heritage, Richmond, Virginia
Housemade charcuterie from Chef Joe Sparatta/Heritage

Nothing beats eating the local foods of a region while you’re on the ground in that region—tracking down the traditional dishes, tasting the modern updates, drinking the local beer, perusing the markets, trying what you cannot try “back home.” That is, after all, the founding principle of this website. But we’re grateful that here in New York City, sometimes the local foods of far-flung places—and the chefs who work magic with them—come to us. Lately we've been on a kick with the regional foods of small(ish)-town America, which actually makes it all the more interesting—cities we’d never before considered in a culinary sense are...

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Tags: events United States

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A Taste of the Ozarks in N.Y.C. Laura Siciliano-Rosen November 9, 2013

Chefs working at the James Beard House, NYC
The “Best of Bentonville” chefs at work in the James Beard House kitchen

We’ll be honest: Ozarks cuisine was never really at the top of our want list. When we thought of that rural region, which extends across southern Missouri into northwestern Arkansas and parts of Oklahoma and Kansas, we mostly thought of Walmart (it has its corporate headquarters in the area) and that depressing Winter’s Bone movie. Maybe they hunt squirrel there?

But then we were invited, on behalf of Bentonville, Arkansas’s esteemed Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, to the James Beard House, in the West Village, for a showcase of regional food from the area, featuring chefs from four downtown...

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Tags: events United States

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Quintessential, Quirky Rhode Island: What to Eat Laura Siciliano-Rosen October 24, 2013

In teeny Rhode Island, our usual city spotlight becomes a state spotlight—and what a state for local food it is. Hot wiener with coffee milk, anyone?  

Raw local oysters and clams in Rhode Island
Local seafood in Providence

We’d heard of the hot dog with the funny name—the New York system—likely from a TV show over the years. But that was pretty much the extent of our knowledge, pre-research, of typical Rhode Island eats. Then we heard from Dayna, a family friend and Cranston local whom we’d emailed for initial ideas. She replied with a laundry list of “oddies,” as she called them, and nearly introduced us to a whole new vocabulary in the process: gaggahs with the works, awful awful, doughboys, stuffies. Is Rhode Island...

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Tags: destinations United States

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New Orleans: Too Many Cocktails, Too Little Time Laura Siciliano-Rosen September 10, 2013

Girls drinking French 75s in New Orleans

A recent jaunt through NOLA had one of our friends pronounce, at the end of a long night, "I think I've drunk every drink this town has to offer." Did she, though? (She was still standing, so it's highly unlikely!)

It's a task easier said than done, that's for sure. No less than five classic cocktails trace their origins back to the old-line Creole restaurants and divey drinking dens of New Orleans, and a slew of others have somehow migrated down to the bayous, gradually adopting the Big Easy as their home. Then there's the regional craft beers, the quirky lunchtime 25-cent martinis, and the more modern mixology-driven drinks on the scene today. Too much to handle in one sitting?...

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Tags: drinks United States

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Dish Spotlight: Saltwater Taffy, Jersey Shore Laura Siciliano-Rosen August 1, 2013

A box of saltwater taffy from the Jersey Shore

What is it about this soft, chewy candy that’s so transporting? Maybe it’s the packaging: bright, happy colors; wax paper wrappers; pastel boxes depicting beach panoramas. Maybe it’s the sweet creamy taste, or the sticky texture that makes you feel like a kid again. But likely it’s the fact that it’s so steeped in Jersey Shore history to be entwined with the area forever. As the legend goes, an Atlantic City boardwalk peddler’s candy store was flooded by ocean water one day in the late 1880s, and when a child came in asking for taffy, the peddler joked that what he had was “saltwater taffy.”

Like taffy to teeth, the name stuck.

Saltwater taffy, so ubiquitous at the Shore as to...

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Tags: dishes United States

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The Case for American Food Laura Siciliano-Rosen July 4, 2013

What is American cuisine—and is it as bad as foreign menus would have us believe?

Shake Shack burger in New York City

You’re at your family BBQ for the 4th of July. What’s on the menu? Why, hot dogs and hamburgers, of course! Classic Americana summer fare, complemented perhaps by some chicken wings, mayo-based salads, and corn on the cob. Some of the very same stuff that has come to represent, in many ways, “American food,” at least as distilled down on menus around the world, from Colombia to India. And while I would chow down on those burgers and dawgs with the best of them at said BBQ, this makes me, as an American, kind of sad.

America, we can do better than that!

Actually, America does do better than that,...

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Q&A: Nathan Kaiser, Craft Distiller, Seattle Naomi Bishop June 10, 2013

Nathan Kaiser of 2Bar Spirits, in Seattle
Nathan, pictured in 2bar Spirits’ tasting room next to a photo of his grandfather holding his father at 2Bar ranch. Photo by Naomi Bishop

“We are exceptionally fortunate to be located in Seattle—this city celebrates diversity and locally sourced products.”—Nathan Kaiser, owner-operator of 2bar Spirits

Tell us about what you do.
I am the owner-operator of Seattle’s 2bar Spirits, a craft distillery that’s entirely handmade from 100% locally grown grain. 2bar embodies “from grain to glass.” Whole grains arrive from local farmers, and we take those grains and make spirits entirely on site at our SODO location. We make 2bar Vodka, which is a wheat-based vodka, and 2bar Moonshine, a...

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Tags: food producer Q&A United States

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From Shore to Table: Digging, Cleaning & Cooking Razor Clams in Washington Naomi Bishop April 29, 2013

Digging for razor clams off the Washington coastline
Photo by Naomi Bishop.

While most American families got up early on Easter morning to hunt about their lawns for eggs, my friend (and partner-in-foraging) Leslie, trusty canine companion Roger, and I were combing Grayland beach, on the southwest Washington coast, for razor clams (OK, Roger mostly just ran in circles). There were no bunnies or pastel plastic eggs to be found on this shoreline, just a rainbow of gray, with little definition between the muted-steel sky and the faint slate of the ocean. My eyes were trained on the muddy taupe of the sand most of the day, scanning for “tells,” the tiny, dime-size indents that indicate a clam lurking just below the surface.

It was late...

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Tags: recipes travel United States

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Dish Spotlight: Central Texas BBQ Laura Siciliano-Rosen March 7, 2013

Central Texas BBQ on butcher paper: sausage, ribs, brisket, pickles.
The typical spread, at City Market in Luling, Texas.

A meat-eater does not visit Central Texas—eclectic state capital Austin included—without making BBQ a priority. But what is BBQ, that most regional and fiercely beloved of American dishes, here? It’s a holy trinity of smoked brisket, pork ribs, and sausage, slow-cooked over big oak-fed pits in the manner introduced to the area—primarily to the towns of Lockhart, Luling, and Taylor, each within about an hour’s drive from Austin—in the mid-19th century by German and Czech settlers, who’d often smoke leftover cuts of meat from their butcher shops. The Texans loved it, took to calling it BBQ, and adopted the style as their...

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Best Poke in Hawaii: Five Spots to Try Naomi Bishop February 20, 2013

Ahi limu poke from Tamashiro Market in Honolulu
Ahi limu poke from Tamashiro Market, Honolulu.

Its time zone might be a few hours behind, but Hawaii is way ahead of the rest of the country when it comes to raw fish. While it took most of America well into the 1990s to be swept into the sushi craze, Hawaii has long loved the simple seafood salad called poke. It’s a fixture of every Hawaiian restaurant menu, takeout deli, and grocery store; even the local Costco keeps a well-stocked high-quality selection.

The word itself means “to cut,” and cut it has been: In all the multitude of poke variations, the components are chopped into bite-size pieces. Freshly caught local fish and seafood like tako (octopus) and ahi tuna are chopped...

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Dish Spotlight: Egg Creams in New York City Laura Siciliano-Rosen February 5, 2013

Chocolate egg cream at a lunch counter in New York City

Egg creams are perhaps my favorite thing to insist that visitors to New York try, because no one ever knows what the hell they are—in fact, I know far too many residents here who aren’t familiar with them! The first point to clarify is that there are no eggs in an egg cream, nor is there cream. That’s an important distinction, as many people are immediately turned off by the drink’s name. (Which doesn’t make sense in a country that loves Cadbury creme eggs, but I suppose it is a fear of consuming raw eggs.)

It’s not clear why they are called egg creams or who exactly invented them, though it was most likely a Jew, probably in Brooklyn. A few years ago, The New York Times outlined...

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Tags: dishes United States

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Recipes From Afar: Portuguese Kale Soup, Cape Cod Laura Siciliano-Rosen January 2, 2013

Caldo Verde Portuguese Soup

Every summer, Cape Cod is among our favorite go-to escapes, a long weekend with local friends for which we’re always in for lots of boating, clamming, lobstering, swimming, and, of course, eating. (As we’ve previously admitted, however, we are pretty bad about working when we’re in this area.) New Year’s weekend marked our first winter trip to the Cape, and it proved a long-overdue visit with its snowy conservation lands and starkly beautiful shores, transformed by snowdrifts and the absence of tourists. Of course, we spent a lot of time indoors, and when we weren’t in front of the fireplace, we were in the kitchen.

Wellfleet, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, during winter
Wintry Wellfleet, Cape Cod

Snowy wooded landscape in Falmouth, Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Hiking the woods in East...

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Tags: recipes cape cod United States

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Quintessential New Haven: What to Eat Laura Siciliano-Rosen December 10, 2012

In a new series of city spotlights, we’ll sum up in quick bloggy format the essential dishes of destinations we cover in full elsewhere. Think of them as teasers, or perhaps appetizers for more! First up is one of our more recently covered cities, New Haven, Connecticut, an iconic pizza town with some hidden gems to boot.

Downtown green in New Haven, Connecticut
The New Haven Green

New Haven has an affinity for the old. This is, after all, a nearly 375-year-old New England city, with all the usual hallmarks: an Ivy League university (Yale); ­a spacious Puritan-constructed downtown “green,” or grassy town square; graceful if peeling Victorian architecture; even a nickname after trees (Elm City). Fortunately, that respect...

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Tags: destinations United States

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Post-Sandy, Coastal New York City (Still) Needs Help Laura Siciliano-Rosen November 27, 2012

In honor of what’s being called Giving Tuesday, here’s the second of our two Hurricane Sandy posts (see our Jersey Shore post here), in which we provide resources for relief concerning the damaged coastal communities of NYC.

View of the NYC skyline through a fence, from Williamsburg, Brooklyn

It’s easy to forget sometimes that Manhattan is an island, embraced by three rivers and a bay, and the outer boroughs of New York City extend into the Atlantic, with beaches and boardwalks just like the rest of the Northeast shoreline. Following Hurricane Sandy’s destructive path through the area, however, everyone was reminded of this with a vengeance, via heartbreaking reports of whole neighborhoods destroyed—flooded, washed out to sea, even burned to the...

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Thoughts of the Jersey Shore, Post-Sandy Laura Siciliano-Rosen November 14, 2012

Point Pleasant Boardwalk
Point Pleasant boardwalk in winter, circa 1998

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, I find my sympathies torn between two places I hold near and dear: New York City—particularly those devastated areas of Brooklyn, near where we used to live, and Queens, where we live now—and the Jersey Shore, where I grew up in the town of Brick. While we’ve been able to physically volunteer only in Queens thus far, and have donated funds to these areas (and certain individuals) specifically, mostly I’ve just helplessly watched the awful TV and web footage, listened sympathetically to the stories of friends and family members more directly affected, and wondered what else I—among the lucky ones who...

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Crazy for Clam Chowder in Cape Cod Laura Siciliano-Rosen September 5, 2012

Bucket of clams, or quahogs, on Cape Cod

The buildup starts on the long drive north. There’s traffic getting out of the city, traffic in Connecticut—where we might stop for pizza in New Haven—and traffic navigating around Providence, Rhode Island. But we’re giddy with anticipation for what’s always our favorite weekend of the summer, when we visit dear friends on Cape Cod.

For the past 10 years, we have been fortunate to have insider access to the Cape and its endless nooks and crannies. Our friends there share our love for adventure, but even better, they have the skills and means of making our wildest summer dreams come true. Over the years these have included: spontaneous flights to Nantucket, catching and grilling...

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Tags: travel cape cod United States

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Video: One Minute in…Asheville! Laura Siciliano-Rosen June 26, 2012

You’ve likely heard about Asheville, North Carolina by now—how it’s chock-full of eclectic, farm-to-table restaurants; how it was just voted Beer City U.S.A. for the fourth year running; or perhaps how its spectacular surroundings recently provided the on-location setting for The Hunger Games. In fact, a few days in this small town in the Blue Ridge Mountains is hardly enough to satisfy all the hiking, eating, drinking, and even zip-lining you’ll want to do here. But, hey, we had to at least try. Here’s our one minute of living the good life in Asheville.



Find out more about what to eat, how to burn it off, and where to stay in Asheville. 

 

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Miami Eats in Marlins Park Laura Siciliano-Rosen May 17, 2012

Plantain chips with mojo garlic sauce from Latin American Grill in Marlins Park, Miami

It’s not uncommon these days to see a city’s best local foods represented in its sports stadiums: Tony Luke’s iconic cheesesteak in Philly’s Citizens Bank Park, Shake Shack burgers in New York’s Citifield, peach cobbler in Atlanta’s Georgia Dome. But we were still pleasantly surprised with the offerings we saw this weekend at Marlins Park, the brand-new high-tech home of the Miami (née Florida) Marlins. Despite resembling a futuristic alien spacecraft, with its gleaming-white exterior and cool retractable roof, the stadium goes the extra mile to spotlight cuisine reflective of the multi-culti coastal city’s roots—and even those of the visiting team.

Along the perimeter of the...

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Farmers Market, Extended Scott Rosen November 20, 2010

 Hot green and red peppers from the farmers market.

It was such a relief last week to find out the local Queens farmers market has been changed to year round. With only a week left to Thanksgiving, we usually are stocking up on the turkey meat and sausage that we will freeze and use throughout the winter. We have previously made good use of that system, but not getting seasonal vegetables has been the hard part. “Do we really have to go to Trade Fair [our overcrowded supermarket] for produce?” This is a common question we repeat throughout the cold months. “I miss the farmers market,” with a sad face, is another generic overused statement during the dark days of January and February.

We have become so accustomed to our Sunday walk...

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Tags: markets United States sustainability Queens

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