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A Most Unusual Dinner in Chioggia

Calle ponte caneva, 915, Chioggia
labruttafigura

The dining experience at Jackie Tonight is somewhere between dreams and inebriation. The interior of Jackie’s house is a warren of dark rooms made yet more befuddling by the smoke from open fires... Read more

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Jackfruit: It’s What’s for Dinner (Product Review) Laura Siciliano-Rosen May 20, 2016

Carnitas-style jackfruit over rice, from Upton's Naturals.

In this new occasional series, we’ll review international food products on the market that our readers may be interested in. Disclosure: Upton’s Naturals sent us samples of this product free of charge. All opinions are honest and our own (also: unpaid).

If you’ve seen jackfruit before, you’re unlikely to forget it: It’s going to be the largest fruit in any spread. I see it all the time here in Queens, where we have a sizable Asian population, a hulking greenish-yellow fruit with spiky reptilian skin. But despite vague memories of tasting—and loving—sweet, ripe jackfruit in Vietnam once upon a time, and even stronger memories of an excellent cardamom-scented jackfruit appetizer at...

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Tags: product review sustainability

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In the Bahamas, to Conch or Not to Conch? Laura Siciliano-Rosen March 10, 2016

It’s a famously overexploited, not quite endangered, species. But when conch is on every menu in town, there’s got to be a ton of ’em, right? A look at that beloved Caribbean mollusk, the queen conch—and how to help protect it.

Man selling conch shells in Nassau, the Bahamas
Shell vendor on Potter's Cay, Nassau


“Are you feeling conchy tonight?” the waitress inquired with a smile when we wondered aloud about the Bimini conch linguine—a $22 Bahamian take on the traditional Italian clam dish, apparently. We were at a sports bar outside Nassau with friends and our collective flock of young kids, and we’d already had conch fritters and a conch patty earlier that day. The general consensus: Aren’t we always feeling conchy down...

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Tags: Caribbean sustainability food culture

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